Red Lamb Circa 2011 - 2013


The was the official website for Red Lamb. The domain's registration expired. The new owner, Jason Horowitz, a Red Lamb fan and parent of an autistic son, decided to keep an edited version of the original site's content for any visitors who inadvertently found the site. Although he works part time for a janitor service PA, he is also an autism advocate and speaks of his experiences to help groups sharing information with other parents of autistic children. Through his job he has met several other parents who either have children or other family members who are autistic. This archived site has become a kind of inspiration to Jason and to the community he serves.

Red Lamb and Dans Spitz are on mission of global Autism Advocacy “Awareness”, a very worthy cause.

Content is from the site's 2011-2013 archived pages.
Take a nostalgic trip back....

 

The band's line-up included Dan Spitz (lead guitar, guitar, bass guitar, programming, background vocals, engineering,co-producer) and Don Chaffin (vocals and video productions) with 'Brothers In Arms' Patrick Johansson (drums), Chris Vrenna (programming and synths).

 

Red Lamb is an American rock duo, formed in Palm Beach, Florida in 2010 by three time Grammy nominated, multi-platinum recording artist and the worlds first Intergalactic heavy metal recording artist who’s music has been played on two planets consecutively (Mars & Earth). Dan Spitz.

Since its conception, the band’s line-up has included Dan Spitz (lead guitar, guitar, bass guitar, programming, background vocals, engineering,co-producer) and Don Chaffin (vocals and video productions) with ‘Brothers In Arms’ Patrick Johansson (drums), Chris Vrenna (programming and synths).

The band has been described by critics as a variety of genres, most commonly explosive hard rock, pop punk, alternative rock, with a taste of thrash.

This fresh new music and return of one of the creators of a genre is Co-Produced by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz.

All Lyrics are co-written by Mustaine and Spitz, All music written by Spitz and lead guitar work by Spitz.

Their debut album was mixed by Grammy nominated producer Johnny K (disturbed, 3 doors down, drowning pool, megadeth..) and features guest appearances of famous artists throughout the recording.

Hailing from the streets of New York with a hunger to succeed Dan Spitz sets forth his first musical project outside of Anthrax where he has sold more than 15 million cd’s for music he has co-written and co-produced.

Spitz calls Red Lamb “music for a new era”.

With the addition of mega players like Grammy winner Chris Vrenna on synths and programming (nine inch nails, marilyn manson) for the entire CD you will certainly be pounded with metal from one of the creators of a genre who has now returned to riff another day, for all of us.

Spitz and Mustaine have penned the first heavy metal song (lyrics co-written by Dave Mustaine of Megadeth and Dan Spitz), and video about AUTISM.

The video “Puzzle Box” is an insight of truth about Autism and the Spitz families daily struggles with it. The video includes Bob and Suzanne Wright, co-founders of Autism Speaks within.

Dan and Candi Spitz have identical mirror image twins boys with Autism.

Red Lamb and Dans Spitz are on mission of global Autism Advocacy “Awareness”..

 

Music

The Cage

Music by Dan Spitz
Lyrics by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Co-Produced by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Mixed by Johnny K
© 2011 Mustaine/Spitz

One Shell (in the chamber)

Music by Dan Spitz
Lyrics by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Co-Produced by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Mixed by Johnny K
© 2011 Mustaine/Spitz

Stand-by Passenger

Music by Dan Spitz
Lyrics by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Co-Produced by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Mixed by Johnny K
© 2011 Mustaine/Spitz

Runaway Train

Music by Dan Spitz
Lyrics by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Co-Produced by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Mixed by Johnny K
© 2011 Mustaine/Spitz

Puzzle Box

Music by Dan Spitz
Lyrics by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Co-Produced by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Mixed by Johnny K
© 2011 Mustaine/Spitz



The song 'Puzzle Box' is a walk through the daily life of a family with identical mirror image twins who are both Autistic. It is a moving experience of reality that the Spitz family lives. The video is a short movie with statistical data, showing thousands of Autistic families, including the founders of www.autismspeaks.org (Suzanne and Bob Wright) throughout and with the Spitz' children Brendan and Jaden.

 

Puzzle Box

Music by Dan Spitz
Lyrics by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Co-Produced by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Mixed by Johnny K
© 2011 Mustaine/Spitz
 

How did this happen
Somebody tell us
Anybody got the guts
Just tell the truth
To the people
The ones who suffer
Just like us

Another torturous day
A fight that I can’t win
Autism aint just Schism
Its blood curdling screams from within
It seems the brain won’t connect
I can’t find a minute of peace
Heightened skills
They come next
With duplicity, it ain’t easy
A struggle day by day by day
We know we’re not alone
Therapists are here most every day
This life, it ain’t easy
A sickness that’s not going away
One day the truth will be revealed
Silent, but Speaking volumes
Is The serpent coiled upon their seal

Every child’s mind is…
Like a puzzle box
But what of the mind that stays…
That stays forever locked?
Early intervention’s The key to it all
Now we lift them up
HE won’t let them fall

Don’t know the bliss of sleep
Don’t recognize their names
Shrieking for no damn reason
They won’t even look at YOU!
Lemme make you all aware?
The Truth sticks in a Doctor’s throat
Whether mortal man or Sorcerer
Now Hypocrite of the Hippocratic Oath
We the parents were never told
WE the people were not prepared
But God blessed America, right
So why’s the White House running scared?

Every child’s mind is…
Like a puzzle box
But what of the mind that stays…
That stays forever locked?
Early intervention’s
The key to it all
Now we lift them up
HE won’t let them fall

Pharmaceutical corruption
Neurological destruction
Monetary seduction Human deconstruction

Every child’s mind is…
Like a puzzle box
But what of the mind that stays…
That stays forever locked?
Early intervention’s
The key to it all
Now we lift them up
HE won’t let them fall

Every single child’s mind is like a puzzle box
But what of the mind that stays
That stays forever locked
Tell me who can cure the puzzle box?
Now we lift them up
HE won’t let them fall

+++
 

Get Up

Music by Dan Spitz
Lyrics by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Co-Produced by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Mixed by Johnny K
© 2011 Mustaine/Spitz

Don't Threaten to Love Me

Music by Dan Spitz
Lyrics by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Co-Produced by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Mixed by Johnny K
© 2011 Mustaine/Spitz

Watchman

Music by Dan Spitz
Lyrics by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Co-Produced by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Mixed by Johnny K
© 2011 Mustaine/Spitz

Angels of War

Music by Dan Spitz
Lyrics by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Co-Produced by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Mixed by Johnny K
© 2011 Mustaine/Spitz

War paint

Music by Dan Spitz
Lyrics by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Co-Produced by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Mixed by Johnny K
© 2011 Mustaine/Spitz

Temptation

Music by Dan Spitz
Lyrics by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Co-Produced by Dave Mustaine and Dan Spitz
Mixed by Johnny K
© 2011 Mustaine/Spitz

 



 

BLOG POSTS

Metal Rockers Shine Light on Autism

Ex-Anthrax guitarist Dan Spitz teams with Megadeth's Dave Mustaine on Red Lamb project

June 11, 2012

 

Former Anthrax guitarist Dan Spitz is back with a new project called Red Lamb, and the band has just released a video for the song "Puzzle Box" (watch below). Co-produced and co-written by Megadeth's Dave Mustaine, the song tackles an unusual subject for metal: autism in children.

When Spitz and his wife, Candi, had identical twins, Brendan and Jaden, they were mystified by the unpredictable behavior of their boys. Even after the twins were diagnosed with autism, information was hard to come by. "When our kids started to go backwards, because they weren't born autistic, we didn’t know where to go," Spitz tells Rolling Stone. "You have to be careful, because there are plenty of people selling snake oil. Back then, we got,'Your kid has to eat this way, and if he doesn't buy our product, he might die.' Once we found Autism Speaks – which was strictly, 'Here's your information' – it was a whole new world."

Raising awareness of autism in the metal community was one of Spitz's inspirations for the song and its fact-filled video. "I can understand why people are scared to talk [about autism] in other forms of music. But the way I was brought up in metal, that's what thrash metal was," Spitz says. "If you read our lyrics, it wasn't, 'Hey baby, I love you.' Whatever bothered us in every day life, that was Anthrax. So we did the same thing with 'Puzzle Box.' We were like, 'It's time. People need to know what we're living here.'"



Dan Spitz and his son Jaden. DCity Studios / Don Chaffin

At around the same time that Red Lamb wrapped its video, the Centers for Disease Control released new statistics showing that about one in 88 children are identified as having a form of autism. "It was mindblowing," Spitz says. "Now the whole world wants to know more."

Spitz began writing songs for what would eventually become his Red Lamb project following a reunion with Anthrax in 2005. Mustaine got involved after hearing some of the music. "Me and Dave Mustaine have been friends forever, and we're kind of quiet friends on a daily basis," Spitz says. "He's just a wonderful human being. I was out there doing stuff in his studio and helping him on a technical aspect, and he was like, 'Play me your stuff.' We usually do not talk about music – our friendship is based solely on our families. He listened to it and really wanted to help."

Co-writing with the Megadeth frontman was a natural next step, Spitz says. "Dave has stayed at my house, and he's one of the few people that understands what we go through on a daily basis with two identical twins that are autistic, and also being away from them out there at his studio recording, and the phone calls that just don't stop of meltdowns and breakdowns," Spitz says. "Who better to co-write what I feel is one of the most important songs of our times than the both of us?"

Red Lamb (which also includes singer Don Chaffin, bassist Randy Coven and drummer Patrick Johansson) self-released their debut LP in February  via iTunes. The group is currently in talks with a booking agent to launch a tour.

"We're not just a band giving to a cause, asking someone, 'Will you please buy this product, because a portion of this product will go to help this needy person in this country,'" Spitz says. "I view Red Lamb as more of a permanent fixture of bringing awareness to the world of what this family lives every day. And that's what people need to know and people need to see."

 



 

Palm Beach Post | Autism | The Spitz Family

A Film crew from the Palm Peach Post lived with my family for a while to produce this incredible article / view of how Candi and I live each day with our struggles, love, autism x2 and determination to prevail, AND to let ALL of YOU a little bit closer into our days.

This is a wonderful article that hopefully puts into perspective the challenges of raising children (we have identical twins age 5) that live with Autism on a daily basis.

A lot of people are still very ignorant and non accepting to the reality of and widely varied behaviors that autism presents. Please share this post and make a difference.

From the bottom of my heart, to the bottom of yours, please help support the Autism “Awareness” both Candi and I….

Have To Do.

Dan Spitz

+++

 

Puzzle Box Video Shoot

March 31, 2012

We have just finished all the video shooting for the song Puzzle Box. It was a lengthy shoot as we had to cover three different locations over a two month period of time. The first locations being an Autism Speaks walk with thousands of families, children and more. The second location being the Spitz household and the third a Long Island, New York Mansion (The Scully Estate) that replicates a French castle.

As we enter the editing stage now for what will be a monumental piece of film we ask all of you to follow Red Lamb on our mission to help spread the awareness of Autism and its staggering increase of epidemic form throughout the world. Please see the new CDC statistics just released this week of 1 in 43 boys born will have Autism.

That is certainly a “Call To Arms” for all of us. Red Lamb will use the song Puzzle Box (a song with lyrics Co-Written by Dave Mustaine of Megadeth and Dan Spitz of Anthrax) to catapult the music industry into doing what it does best. Tell the truth to the people.

With the writers of the lyrics of this song having somewhere around 15 Grammy nominations and also bringing in Grammy winner Chris Vrenna (Marilyn Manson) we hope to show the world how important this message is.

For more information on Autism please visit www.autismspeaks.org

 



 

Puzzle Box | A Song About Autism

January 25, 2012



Listen to the "Puzzle Box" The Song

lease listen to the song “Puzzle Box” when you get a chance. It is a song that certainly hits home here. My wife, Candi, and I have identical twin boys (Brendan and Jaden) with Autism and this song is simply something I had to do.

We struggle each day here with most things. Life isn’t easy.

So if you would like to help the global epidemic that’s here now in a way not possible before …. simply purchase this song and/or just point people to the streaming version and support my new band Red Lamb so I can spread the word and somehow help others through OUR music genre.

Statistics 2009:
One in every 70th boy born
One in every 110th born
I have plans. Please help me to get there if you can.

Thank You All,
Spitz

 



 



He was riding high as a heavy metal guitarist. She was a rock and roll wife. But when their twin boys developed autism, their lives crashed into pieces they are still trying to put together.

Just before Christmas 2011, as Candi Spitz was putting her twin boys to bed, four-year-old Jaden took her face in his tiny hands and said, “Sweet dreams. Mommy loves you.”

Candi burst into tears. These were the first words Jaden had spoken since he and his twin brother Brendan had regressed into autism three years earlier.

“It was my most touching moment,” Candi said. “I knew everything I’ve said to them for the last five years is in there.”

And it gave her the one thing every parent of an autistic child needs: Hope.

Candi’s husband felt it too. Danny Spitz, the twins’ father, is a rock star, Grammy nominee and former lead guitarist for the metal band Anthrax. But none of those accolades mean much when examined beside the arduous daily life of his sons, trapped in a private world of manic meltdowns and rare magic moments.

Just before Christmas 2011, as Candi Spitz was putting her twin boys to bed, four-year-old Jaden took her face in his tiny hands and said, “Sweet dreams. Mommy loves you.”

Candi burst into tears. These were the first words Jaden had spoken since he and his twin brother Brendan had regressed into autism three years earlier.

“It was my most touching moment,” Candi said. “I knew everything I’ve said to them for the last five years is in there.”

And it gave her the one thing every parent of an autistic child needs: Hope.

Candi’s husband felt it too. Danny Spitz, the twins’ father, is a rock star, Grammy nominee and former lead guitarist for the metal band Anthrax. But none of those accolades mean much when examined beside the arduous daily life of his sons, trapped in a private world of manic meltdowns and rare magic moments.

BEFORE DIAGNOSIS, LITTLE MOVIE STARS

Like most children with the developmental brain disorder known as autism, the twins were born “perfect,” Candi says one afternoon.

She’s sitting at the dining room table of her immaculate home in Lantana supervising the boys as they bounce from the computer to the television to the pool and back to the computer again. “Perfect, perfect, perfect,” Brendan repeats. “You are perfect,” Candi tells him. The boys repeat words, and sometimes sing songs they learned at the Palm Beach School for Autism.

The boys are having a good day and Candi is laughing about her pregnancy. “All I did was eat and work out. I craved spinach. I would carry around bags of it.”

Brendan, or is it Jaden (it’s sometimes hard to tell), says: “Talking, talking, talking, talking, talking, talking, talking, I’m-a talking is.” Candi responds: “Mommy’s talking.”

Her voice is calm and kind. Repetition of words or phrases, called echolalia, is common with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), as is echopraxia, the repetition of movements like hand flapping or rocking.

Like many ASD kids, for the first year and a half, things were great. Candi grew up in Palm Beach County, so they moved back here from New York City after the twins were born so they could be near family, including Danny’s mom.

Watching the children today, you’d never guess that they were mini-celebrities in the making. “They started acting when they were four months old,” Candi said. “Movies. Commercials. They did “Law and Order” and “Rescue Me.” And they got picked to do this movie, ‘Away We Go,’ with Maggie Gyllenhall, directed by Sam Mendes.”

The initial filming took place when the twins were about a year old. Six months later they had to reshoot some scenes. “They had been getting a little distant and we didn’t know what it was,” Candi said. “They had just had their shots and Jaden had a really severe reaction, five days on the couch. My crazy, fearless, silly kid, the one we always joked was going to be a motocross or BMX rider came home and just collapsed. I was in a panic. But after five days he seemed fine.”

But when they took the boys to film a commercial for the Spitz’ own product line, a miniature drum set, they wouldn’t cooperate. Everyone told them not to worry, but Candi knew in her heart that something was wrong.

“Everything happened over a two-week window. At 17 and half months, they started refusing to eat. Then they wouldn’t let you kiss them, hug them, or touch them, and the next day they wouldn’t make eye contact.

“By the end of the two weeks, they had this Playschool Ball Popper toy with an air motor and they would push the button over and over to hear the motor and rock this slow rock, all day long.

“They didn’t play, or watch TV. They didn’t respond to us. They were completely gone. And I lost it. I shut down. And Danny locked himself in the recording studio and never came out.”

‘WE DON’T UNDERSTAND WHY’

When it was time for the boys’ 18-month check-up, the pediatrician didn’t have any answers either. He agreed something was wrong. “He wouldn’t say autism.’’

He also told Candi to wait and see, but waiting isn’t something she does well. “During that time I was searching out everywhere I could possibly go, and I was pretty much alone during that time. You just had to be strong all day; you couldn’t let them see you cry. So I would fake smile all day long and deal with them and they would go to bed and I would cry my eyes out.”

Determined to find out what was wrong with her boys, she slept with her laptop, searching for answers at night until she fell asleep, exhausted. When the diagnosis was confirmed, Candi couldn’t even say the words out loud.

The statistics for ASD were shocking then and they’re worse now. Rates continue to rise. Based on the latest data from the CDC, the chance for boys is 1 in 54 births, about four times higher than it is in girls. Rates among Hispanics are rising the fastest, with African-Americans close behind.

While rare genetic differences have been identified, ASD is not a purely genetic disorder. Experts believe that the environment plays a critical role in who develops ASD.

“Current thinking is that it appears to be strongly genetic and is probably a combination of both genetics and environment,” said Tanya Paparella, a Ph.D. and director of UCLA’s Early Childhood Partial Hospitalization Program, an internationally recognized treatment program for young children with autism.

“We don’t truly understand why. We don’t know if it’s a true increase or if there is another reason. We’ve seen an increase in high functioning, as opposed to classical autism, which could be as a result of diagnostic criteria. Diagnostic instruments now are more refined. Pediatricians are required to screen and in general there’s more knowledge among professionals.”

But even three years ago, information was sparse, and those first few months were a lonely time for Candi. She tried to cope with the boy’s strange behaviors: They frequently had meltdowns if their routine wasn’t followed.

“Their brain is not our brain,” Danny explains. “It’s all at their pace. It’s the reverse role of parenting. You can erase everything in this interview and keep just this: When you have autistic children, you’re no longer the boss. You’re no longer the parent. In the autism world, if you tell them no, they can’t have pizza for breakfast, they might never eat pizza again.”

Candi agrees. “That’s the hardest part: you’re crying because you can’t figure out what they want. Half the time you’re offering everything under the sun. You’re ripping pages out of textbooks, and you’re so frustrated. There are meltdowns everywhere you go. And they can’t say they’re sorry, not that they should have to say they’re sorry, because they haven’t done anything wrong. They just can’t get their point across and they’re frustrated.”

Of the two parents, Danny may have the hardest time coping.

“Our days are hell,” Danny said. “I’m not going to sugarcoat it. Our days suck. Do we get enjoyment out of our children? On occasion. But our days are not like your days. To get our kids into the car, or to transition anywhere, can take weeks of planning.

“We post that we’re going to Disney and everyone writes, ‘Enjoy!’ And I’m like, ‘No, this is therapy.’ We have to go where they tell us to go and we have to ride what they want to ride. If you get to the ride and it’s broken, the kid goes into a meltdown and people want to call the cops on us because the kid is trying to self-injure himself on the floor. We’ve been thrown out of every ride, but the more times we go, the more repetitions, we hope, when they‘re older, they’ll be able to go without any meltdowns.”

“We make them wait in line for some things, as long as it’s not too bad, because they eventually need to learn to wait,” Candi said. But learning takes time.

AUTISM SCHOOL MAKES A DIFFERENCE

Candi Spitz has two puzzle pieces tattooed on the inside of her wrist. What may seem like a rock-star fashion statement has a much deeper meaning: parents of autistic children are searching for any connection, any key. The longtime logo of autistic help organizations is a puzzle piece, which reflects the disorder’s mysterious nature and complexity.

Candi’s search for answers continued until she found the group Autism Speaks, whose local chapter is having its annual fund-raising walk this morning in downtown West Palm Beach (see box). Now Candi serves as their spokesperson and she travels to speak to groups around the country about ASD.

“Autism Speaks was the first place we went to that wasn’t selling us snake oil,” Danny said. “Like any other disease, a lot of it is ‘Buy this product.’”

They didn’t try to sell Candi anything, but they did encourage her to visit the Palm Beach School for Autism, then housed in the A.G. Holley Hospital complex, on Lantana Road, east of I-95. Candi had been determined to home school the boys, but she also wanted what was best for them.

“They told me, ‘You know how the best pizza comes from the little dive?’ It’s the same thing. The best teachers and the best therapists are here, but just close your eyes when you walk in,’” Candi laughs. “The first day the principal called me every hour.”

But just getting the twins to school could take twice that long. “The first two years of school, getting Brendan ready used to be a nightmare. So much screaming, and you’d get him in the car and it was a 20-minute drive to school.”

Now the school occupies a brand new building on Lantana Road just west of the Turnpike, a stones-throw from the Spitz’s home. Jaden and Brendan and about 200 other kids go to school there Monday through Friday. Ann Levene-Eisenberg is the executive director and the mother of an autistic son, who’s now an adult.

The school’s mission, she says, is “to make each child the best he can be for the real world.” Children are grouped according to their functional level and students take subjects including occupational therapy and practical life skills as well as traditional academics like science and reading.

The school has 14 elementary, five middle and five preschool teachers as well as a speech pathologist, teacher’s aides, a full-time custodian and even some volunteers. They also have a person devoted to applied behavioral analysis, the therapy that is the core of everything else they teach.

In its simplest form, ABA — what used to be called behavior modification — is a two-pronged approach pairing positive reinforcement – a reward of some kind given in exchange for a desired behavior – and repetition – the way we learn and master almost all basic skills, from tying our shoes and brushing our teeth to writing and reading.

The teachers use ABA to build a bridge between home and school by teaching kids behaviors that help with their home life, and every child has an individual education plan as unique as they are. Of course nothing works all of the time, and some children show little or no improvement despite early intervention and therapies. Other children progress, but very slowly.

“The whole school celebrates when someone gets potty trained or learns to ride a two-wheeler or a non-verbal child says, ‘good morning,’” Leven-Eisenberg said.

TRYING TO KEEP MARRIAGE TOGETHER

While the boys are in school, Candi hits the gym, literally, for a high-intensity kickboxing workout. “No matter how hard my day is, that snaps me back,” she says.

“My way of coping is different from everyone else’s,” Candi said. “I can’t be negative. I have to approach this with a positive outlook and think of it as a blessing because it changed who I was. I was the spoiled wife of a rock star and I didn’t have to work. I just travelled around the country and I only cared about me. Who would have thought that words like ‘kids’ and ‘stay at home mom’ and ‘disabilities’ would become my routine?

“I believe it had to be God’s plan for me. In a way I’m thankful because I look back and I’m embarrassed by the old me. I was not a good person. I was very selfish and I took life for granted and there are things I could have done differently.”

Most people who have seen Candi interacting with the boys are impressed with her skill and patience, but there have also been times when she’s had to explain to a police officer in the Target parking lot that her sons are autistic and that’s the reason they have been screaming for an hour. More first responders and other professionals are receiving training in dealing with kids and adults with ASD since they’re encountering it more often.

Candi has learned to detect minute changes in the boys’ behavior, anticipating anything might trigger a meltdown. Neither boy eats well: One loves Quaker Apple Cinnamon Rice Cakes (and only those), which are no longer stocked in Florida and must be ordered online. The other will only drink a special apple-flavored protein drink. Jaden has worn the same olive green T-shirt to school since June, and often has on two different shoes. But those are not the battles Candi and Danny want to fight.

Danny and Candi are fighting to hold their marriage together.

The stress of having a child “on the spectrum,” as it’s called, is often too much for couples. Divorce is common, but no one can say how many of those couples would have divorced anyway. Still, the Spitzes are not the “walk away” type. Neither gives up easily.

They’re both seeing counselors. And just a few weeks ago, Danny and Candi went on their first date since the twins were born.

“Lately we’ve had a lot more good days,” Candi said.

But routines are about to be disrupted in the Spitz house again.

Danny left on on tour Friday with his new band, Red Lamb, which also features Megadeth’s Dave Mustaine. Candi will be on her own with the boys, but both hope the family will come out on the road for a few dates.

The tour bus for the Anarchy for Autism tour will be a giant, moving billboard for ASD awareness and the band will play a song they wrote about the importance of early diagnosis and intervention, called “Puzzle Box,” which might also give a sense of what the Spitz’s have gone through:



— Photography by Thomas Cordy

 



 

Dan and Candi Spitz speaking in depth on the Alex Jones Show about life with identical twin mirror image boys who have Autism (who were not born with Autism).

Reaching over 17 million viewers this interview has already impacted many. Helping bring Autism “Awareness” through music Dan Spitz marches forward in a way no other musician has before.



Dan Spitz: Vaccines Are The Binary Weapon Trigger
On today's show Alex welcomes American musician Dan Spitz and his wife Candi Spitz to speak about their fight against autism and their ongoing crusade to alert as many people as possible to the dangers of vaccines.

 



 

And We're Off Running...

January 25, 2011

It’s been a long hard road getting this monster off the ground. Obstacle after obstacle trying to thwart the cause, but we made it. I’m back !

Receiving a full dose of help from my good friend Dave Mustaine it took on a wonderful  pathway toward a new sound and a new way. 

Dave and I wrote some incredible lyrics together for these songs. We had a great time doing this part of the writing. Handing over the reigns to him to start cutting up my musical creations (that means co-producing) certainly wasn’t easy to do, but our bond both musically and in other ways made an easy avenue toward creating what I think are many masterpieces that will stand the test of time.

It took a long time to create a sound I don’t think resembles anything I’ve heard yet, but at the same time brings a feeling of instant familiarity.

Time to introduce Donny to you. He’s an incredible singer who can sing anything I throw at him. You’ll witness this once he hits the stage. He’s also in charge of all video related excursions. One creative and talented individual. He’s really excited to meet all of you on the road.

With help from our “Brothers In Arms” Chris Vrenna (NIN and Marilyn Manson) and Patrick Johansson (Wasp and Yngwie) we crushed in the studio.

Full time and full bore Red Lamb will roll. Please help us by supporting round 2. Ding ! I’m back.

 

Spitz

It’s our pleasure to announce Red Lamb / Dan Spitz has signed a record deal for most countries outside the USA with MIG Records Europe. Global touring to commence shortly.

 

 

RedLambOfficial.com